Tag Archives: Theology

Communion; Unworthily vs. unworthy…

I discussed the doctrine of transubstantiation in two parts which you can find here; pt. 1 & pt. 2.  I mentioned that I was going to comment on Paul’s injunction about taking communion unworthily, and that we are to examine ourselves.  Throughout different denominations, teachers have been misusing these verses to try to lay a guilt trip on people for their sin when partaking of the bread and wine; however, if one looks at the verses in question, things start becoming clear.  We are indeed to examine ourselves, and we are not to take unworthily, but what exactly does this mean?

1 Corinthians 11:27 Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. 28 But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup. 29 For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord’s body.

I hold that the bread and wine are symbols (not “just” symbols or “mere” symbols, but symbols full of meaning, that serve several purposes), as taught by Christ and Paul (and even James indirectly). However, there is power in the act, or in the taking. Why do I say this? Because one can eat and drink temporary “damnation,” or rather rendered judgment (in the Greek; krima), or sickness on themselves, according to Paul. Eating and drinking without remembering Jesus and His sacrifice leads to this.

Of course, in Paul’s example, there were people eating and drinking the bread and wine after they were drunk, and/or they had come to have a full meal together, and did not set apart the bread and cup, but rather drank and ate hungrily without thinking on Christ. They weren’t taking it worthily…in other words they were partaking in an unworthy manner.

The Greek word used for “unworthily” is anaxious, which is an adverb describing the act (remember, adverbs describe verbs, not nouns), not the person.  Worthiness in this context is not about the person taking the communion, it is about how it is taken. We aren’t to examine ourselves before partaking, we are to remember Christ.  So, from scripture, we are not to examine ourselves, for worthiness, that takes our “eyes” off Christ, and puts them on ourselves. The only way to take unworthily is to take not remembering Christ’s sacrifice, and by so doing, we fail to remember Him and fail to show forth His sacrifice.  So to examine ourselves means to make sure we’re remembering Christ, that we aren’t just eating because we’re hungry (or drunk). None of us are worthy, as far as that goes, so there’s no examination necessary when it comes to our being unworthy.

Anyone who tries to get people to examine themselves for things like sin when partaking of the bread and wine are doing the very thing Paul warned against; taking our “eyes” and minds off of Christ, and neglecting to take in rememberance of Him.  Now, there is a responsibility on the part of the person taking the bread and wine to realize what it is symbolic of…this is why non-Christians should abstain from taking communion; they don’t believe in Jesus as the Son of God, and therefore would not be partaking in remembrance and faith in Him, nor to show forth His body, broken for us, and His blood shed for the remission of our sin.  Again, I look forward to going more in depth about how Passover fits in with communion, and remembering Christ’s sacrifice for us in a later post.

I owe much of this teaching and understanding to the late Dr. Gene “Doc” Scott…his teaching on this idea has helped to refocus believers hearts and minds onto Christ.  If a person’s sins were going to stop us from taking communion, none of us could partake.  Communion, or the taking of the bread and cup is one of the straightforward symbols and acts that Christ Himself instituted, and instructed us as believers to do.

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Filed under Communion, Theology

John 6 and Transubstantiation (pt.1) …

Since this is my first post about Roman church (RC) doctrine, I want to make something clear from the outset.  As long as a person, as an individual, has placed all their trust and faith in and on Jesus Christ, The Father, and The Holy Spirit to save them, I don’t care what denominational title they give themselves.  I believe in the universal church; the ekklesia, in the Greek, that is made up of all believers regardless of what they call themselves.  We are to work out our own salvation with fear and trembling; I’m not willing to judge another’s salvation, that is between them and God.

That being said, I believe that all doctrine of all denominations is fair game when testing them to see if they hold up to the Apostle’s teachings, mainly found in scripture.  One of the claims of the RC is that their teachings will not contradict scripture, but that some of their teachings are based more on oral tradition.  Most of us Protestants have some issues with some of the RC teaching because they can’t be found in scripture, and are sometimes contradicted by the word.  I’ve always believed we should study to show ourselves approved, and I’ve taken a lot of time studying RC doctrines, and I also watch EWTN quite a bit; which I must say is much better in execution and style than most Protestant based television stations.

This post is to look at the doctrine of transubstantiation and John 6, I will raise more issues with the idea of transubstantiation in my next post.  I’m addressing this through John 6 because watching “The Journey Home” on EWTN regularly I’ve noticed an interesting occurrence in those Protestants that become RC…they all say they’ve never heard John 6 explained, which I can’t quite grasp, but I’m going with the flow anyway, and will discuss it here.

To start off; What is transubstantiation? Transubstantiation is the belief that the bread and wine at the celebration of Mass becomes the literal flesh of Christ, and the literal blood of Christ. When it says literal, it means literal. You are no longer eating bread; you are eating flesh (and in fact, the body, blood, soul, and divinity of Christ). You are no longer drinking wine, you are drinking blood. My main contention with this is not that this is taught per se, but rather, scripture is claimed to back it up. Transubstantiation is not something taught in scripture, nor was it believed or taught by the earliest church leaders. When we examine scripture; Christ did not teach it, Paul did not teach it, and even James, the leader at the earliest church, Jerusalem, did not teach it.

John Chapter 6; this chapter, to get at the meaning of Jesus’ words must be read in entirety and in context. Please do so, here I will only give a run down on context, then on to the the main verses at hand.

John 6:1-14 Jesus feeds the five thousand. He fed them loaves of bread and fishes. This same group follows Him after this incident.

John 6:15-21 Jesus walks on the water

John 6:22-71 As we go through this, you’ll probably want your Bible opened to this, or your web-browser open as there is a lot of ground to cover here. I’ll quote the whole verses in my responses.

So, in John chapter 6, the large group that followed Jesus were after one thing:

26 Jesus answered them and said, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Ye seek me, not because ye saw the miracles, but because ye did eat of the loaves, and were filled.

They wanted actual physical literal food. They were there when He did it before (verses 1-14), and they want more.

31 Our fathers did eat manna in the desert; as it is written, He gave them bread from heaven to eat. 32 Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Moses gave you not that bread from heaven; but my Father giveth you the true bread from heaven. 33 For the bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world. 34 Then said they unto him, Lord, evermore give us this bread. 35 And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst. 36 But I said unto you, That ye also have seen me, and believenot.

So Jesus is the Bread of Life. Is He literal flour and water? No. This is a spiritual analogy. This clues us in right off the bat that He’s going to be speaking this way in this discourse. The symbolic language surrounding Christ is present in full effect in the Gospel of John, for example:

John 15: 1 I am the true vine, and my Father is the husbandman. Is Jesus literally a plant? No.

John 4:13 Jesus answered and said unto her, Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst again: 14 But whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into everlasting life. 15 The woman saith unto him, Sir, give me this water, that I thirst not, neither come hither to draw. We have a perfect example here, because what is being compared is an actual drink; water. Does Jesus give actual physical literal water? No.

John 10:9 I am the door: by me if any man enter in, he shall be saved, and shall go in and out, and find pasture Is Jesus a literal door or opening, made out of wood, or nothing? No. He’s a Spiritual one. Is He an actual lamb or lion? Are we literal and physical sheep? No.

John 8:12 Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life. In this context, is He literal light waves? No. The point here is that John especially is filled with highly meaningful symbolic language.

How does Jesus give life to the world? He came, walked perfect, was a sacrifice, gave His flesh and blood in that sacrifice for us. How do we participate in this life He brings us; not by physical eating, but by coming to Him and believing (faithing) on Him. He will not give them physical, literal food, but only Himself to faithe on.

For those that believe in Transubstantiation do you claim not to physically and literally hunger anymore? Do you claim not to thirst? Of course not, so this idea is not a literal physical one. We don’t hunger spiritually anymore, we don’t thirst spiritually anymore after coming to Christ and faithing on Him.

John 6:40 And this is the will of him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day.

For everyone that has Faith in Him, they get everlasting life.

John 6:47 Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me hath everlasting life. 48 I am that bread of life. 49 Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead. 50 This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die. 51 I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world.

So, He is the living bread. For those of you who believe Transubstantiation is literal, do you believe that you will not literally, physically die? Of course not, it is obvious He is talking about spiritual death. If we come to Christ, and Faith on Him, we will not die. How does He give His flesh for the life of the world? By sacrificing it, not by us literally ingesting it.

John 6:52 The Jews therefore strove among themselves, saying, How can this man give us his flesh to eat? 53 Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you. 54 Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day. 55 For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed. 56 He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him. 57 As the living Father hath sent me, and I live by the Father: so he that eateth me, even he shall live by me. 58 This is that bread which came down from heaven: not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead: he that eateth of this bread shall live for ever.

Notice it is NOT as their fathers did eat manna. How did they eat manna? Literally and Physically. We also have a repeat of the phrase “hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day.” Where did we see this phrase before? In verse 40: And this is the will of him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day

So, we get this everlasting life by belief, or more accurately rendered; by faith in Him. This too lines up with all of Paul’s teachings on faith vs. works. And also professing Christ (Romans 10:9 That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. 10 For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation) is indeed what saves, not literally eating or drinking.

John 6:60 Many therefore of his disciples, when they had heard this, said, This is an hard saying; who can hear it? 61 When Jesus knew in himself that his disciples murmured at it, he said unto them, Doth this offend you? 62 What and if ye shall see the Son of man ascend up where he was before? 63 It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life. 64 But there are some of you that believe not. For Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that believed not, and who should betray him. 65 And he said, Therefore said I unto you, that no man can come unto me, except it were given unto him of my Father. 66 From that time many of his disciples went back, and walked no more with him. 67 Then said Jesus unto the twelve, Will ye also go away? 68 Then Simon Peter answered him, Lord, to whom shall we go? thou hast the words of eternal life. 69 And we believe and are sure that thou art that Christ, the Son of the living God.

Now we come to the conclusion of this chapter, and it wraps the whole thing up. It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life. Jesus is blatantly telling us that nothing you physically and literally eat can save you (this goes right along with His teaching that nothing you physically and literally eat can make you unclean; Matthew 15:18). His word are about Spiritual matters, not fleshly, the flesh doesn’t profit anything.  Peter’s answer sheds more light on the situation. “Thou has the WORDS of eternal life.” Peter got it, it was Jesus’ words themselves that were giving life, His teachings. Again, it’s backed up by Peter’s believing Him; thou art that Christ, the Son of the living God. That is what saves, that is what we need to come to and believe in order to have eternal life.

In part 2, I will continue on by examining the reaction of the crowd, and other scriptural insights, such as the scene at the Last Supper, that do not support the doctrine of transubstantiation.

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Jesus; The Lamb and The Lion via Breaking Benjamin

Yesterday I talked about finding the sacred in the secular.  Today, I want to give an example of what I mean, while getting to the point of this post.  My current favourite band is Breaking Benjamin, and I can’t really recommend them to my Christian brethren, though there are many fans of theirs that are Christian; BB is alternative rock, secular, and like to add in the occasional (well placed) curse word.  However, Ben (Benjamin Burnley, lead singer) writes music that hits people on different levels, and encourages fans to find their own meanings to their songs.

One of the reasons that I like this band is their ability to capture certain emotion, and I don’t just mean when they’re screaming at the top of their lungs (which they occasionally indeed do, to very good affect). And, I don’t just like them for the themes that their songs make me conjure up, though that is part of it.  Sooner or Later, a song off their We are not Alone album, makes me think of Jesus and His position as King, and as a Lion, and of life and death without Him.  Now, to make this perfectly clear; I do not think this was Ben’s intent in any way, shape, or form (the song is more a self-reflection style song, and they are not a Christian band, although we know Mark and Chad believe, and ex-band member Jeremy); however, this is what certain verse make me think about.

Sooner or Later
…You’re like an infantile
I knew it all the while
You sit and try to play me
Just like you see on TV
I am an oversight
Just like a parasite
Why am I so pathetic
I know you won’t forget

These lines call to mind the way Jesus is often portrayed by TV preachers; like He’s standing head bowed, hat in hand knocking on your heart’s door, begging, for His own sake, to be let in out of the cold.  He’s also portrayed like a sure-fire celestial slot machine; a genie-type wish granter.  On the other hand, legalistic TV preachers often portray Him as a cosmic killjoy.  These images, that make me personally ill, stick in the minds of non-believers, and it definitely affects how they think about Him and even how they think about Christians.

People, even some believers, like to think of Christ as a Lamb, which He is; what they don’t like to dwell on is the fact that He is the Lion as well.  He is both suffering servant and conquering King, He brings mercy and forgiveness but also a sword of truth… in fact, I read a non-Christian’s write-up about The Chronicles of Narnia in which Aslan, a lion, is the Christ-figure.  The writer bemoans the fact that a lion is used; says it doesn’t fit Jesus’ character…he’s apparently never read the Bible, or he’s listened to too many of the “preachers” this song makes me think of.

…Just call my name
You’ll be ok
Your scream is burning through my veins

We are promised in scripture that whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.  All it takes to get the relationship going is for us to call upon Him with a true desire to know Him better in our hearts.  When we do, He hears us, and wants that relationship too.  One of the images I love to mull over is the idea that we are called sheep in the Bible…and sheep need a shepherd, ours just happens to be a Lion, full of power and protection for those that call upon Him, and He indeed should be a point of fear to those that come bringing trouble to His sheep.

…Sooner or later, you’re gonna hate it
Go ahead and throw your life away
Driving me under leaving me out there
Go ahead and throw your life away

These lines make me think of what will come to pass if someone dies still rejecting God and Christ, unfortunately, and also not to let those image of Christ being peddled on TV stick in your mind; learn of Him on your own, through scripture.  If someone doesn’t come to Him, and embrace eternal life, they are in effect, throwing their lives away.  Most humans, believers and non, and I really mean this, strive to make their way through life the best way they know how.  Many people try to leave the world a better place than they found it…but in essence all of that, without Christ, won’t wind up having a permanent effect.  Even those that don’t believe in anything acknowledge that; our short lives are over far too soon, and we will all probably be forgotten within two or three generations…but, with Christ, our lives find their true meaning, ultimate fulfillment, and we carry on after death, even to a new Heaven, and a new Earth.

Why is it such a bad thing to deny Christ…the next lines in the song change “Throw your life away,” to “Throw my life away.”  By denying Christ, we are basically spitting on His life, and His death.  He suffered horribly, and died so that we might live, and if we deny Him,  we deny His life.  The next go around, the lines get changed to “Throw our life away…” which is ironic, because the name of the album, as I mentioned is “We are not Alone,” God is with us, for sure, and the relationship He offers is such a close one, He offers to be with us in good times and bad, that He will never leave us nor forsake us…imagine throwing that relationship in the garbage…  I love the power, and emotion in Ben’s voice, and the music to underscore the idea of a Person in the position of power, again, just in my own thoughts.

I have two main points in this post; first, just because something is indeed labeled “secular” doesn’t mean we can’t pull something out of it to add to our spiritual lives, we just have to be careful and follow the Holy Spirit’s lead.  And Second, Jesus isn’t a pushover.  He’s not a beggar.  He’d not only the Lamb, but also The Lion.  In Him, God’s Mercy and Justice meet, and He displays both God’s love and His power to mankind.  Whatever the preachers push on TV, and there are some good ones alongside the bad, don’t forget the seek Him one-on-one and through the scriptures and really learn about Him.

For anyone interested, here’s Breaking Benjamin’s video for Sooner or Later at youtube:

Edited on March 19, 2010 to add this link to a relevant article; Breaking Benjamin interview.  Ben and Chad mention issues of faith in the linked interview.

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Without excuse…

There are a few things that anyone attempting Christian apologetics must remember in order for them to keep their sanity.  I’m going to talk about one of those things today.  I’ve alluded to the fact that for Chrisitians, the salvation of souls is always, at the very least at the back of one’s mind, and it should be accompanied with a clear acknowledgment that it isn’t our ultimate responsibility to see those souls saved.  Here is what I mean; we are given the general directive to share the gospel message, which is the good news of Christ, when and where the Holy Spirit leads us to, and to give a reason for our belief if asked, which lets us go into any realm; the Spiritual reasons we have, the emotional, the logical, etc…  To put it in a metaphor, we are to sow the seeds when called (I don’t believe everyone is called to be in the formal position of an evangelist at all times and places, nor that it is our calling to go around beating people over the head with Bibles…)

That’s all well and good in theory, but those of us who have loved ones who are atheistic, or close friends, or even strangers, fellow humans that we worry about, it can be a hard thing to not place more of a burden on ourselves.  We must always remember that it is God doing the ultimate work; John 6:44 No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him: and I will raise him up at the last day. But, the main issue I’m referring to is the fact that everyone is already without excuse when it comes to a belief in God.

As we read in Psalms 19:1 The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork. And, more fully in Romans 1:20 For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: The existence of God is known, and that knowledge is inherent and also seen.  We, as believers interested in Apologetics, do well to keep this in mind, lest we shoulder a bigger burden than what needs to be shouldered.  Yes, going through all the various apologetics with others is interesting and can indeed build one’s faith, but let us not ever take on a false burden that does not belong to us; it is not our fault if, for example, an atheist remains an atheist.  It is easy, esp. for the tenderhearted amongst us, to try to take responsibility, to feel a sense of guilt along with the sadness when someone we dialogue with doesn’t immediately come to the faith…but that idea that somehow we are guilty if someone else doesn’t believe isn’t how it is meant to be, as presented in the scriptures.  We can indeed feel sad, and pray about the situation, and discuss apologetics, but as long as we have presented what we are called to present, which definitely includes the gospel, there is no logical room for overwhelming guilt for some perceived failure on your part.

So, if everyone is without excuse, why then do some lack faith?  Paul tells us a bit further in Romans 1:28 And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge… They did not like to retain God in their knowledge.  When something like this occurs in a secular sense, in psychology, we call that a type of repression; pushing unwanted thoughts aside, or out of conscious awareness.  It is also interesting to me that Paul, in the first chapter of Romans, ties the idea of rejection of God with worship of the creation (anything in nature, anything created) rather than the creator.  What do we see in our modern culture that tries to assert itself as the end all and be all of truth, usually through secular science?  Naturalism.  The idea that everything can be explained through purely natural means. (Which of course begs the question; where did nature/the universe come from?)  So, we do indeed have people who deny God that are worshiping the creation over the Creator.

Why would someone do this; deny God in favor of a lie?  I believe that there are many reasons, too many to touch upon here, but I will mention what seems to be a major factor; emotion.  Ephesians 4:18 Having the understanding darkened, being alienated from the life of God through the ignorance that is in them, because of the blindness of their heart: Several times throughout scripture we are pointed to man’s “heart” as a main problem; honestly, emotions hold sway over many humans, for good and ill.

In my dialogues with various atheists, both in “real life” and on the ‘net, many times there seems to be a strong emotional component to their beliefs, which should probably be expected; there are emotional components to Christian belief as well.  Many non-believers that I have talked to have had bad encounters with Christians in the past; either themselves, or sometimes even more powerful, they cite cases where Christians, or a Christian was cruel to someone in their family.  My clinical psychologist husband (“The Country Shrink”) has just added a post about his experiences with atheists who have had bad relationships with their earthly fathers, and sometimes all that anger, and sadness, and hurt, gets transferred to their Heavenly Father (you can read about it here, if you like: http://thecountryshrink.com/2008/07/01/some-psychological-aspects-of-atheism/ ).  There are some that let pride, or fear, or anger, or complacency get in the way…

Regardless, this message is for non-believers as well, since often times it is easy to get Christians you are dialoguing with to think that if they could just say the right thing, or present just the right evidence that you would suddenly come to faith…just keep in mind that we are all truly without excuse…when we are standing before God, no human will have an excuse for not believeing in Him.

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You’re a sinner, I’m a sinner…

It’s basic Christian theology, right?  That was my immediate thought, and the way I’ve always been taught, both by pastors, family, the Bible, and yes, the Holy Spirit.  Apparently, though, there are many of my fellow Christians out there that mouth these words yet never take them to heart, and quite frankly it’s driving me a bit insane.  I don’t know if this is because pastors, teachers, and preachers out there are not teaching this, or if it has become such a pat phrase that we just nod right on by it.  Honestly, how many of my fellow believers out there read the title “You’re a sinner, I’m a sinner,” and nod right along without really stopping to think what that means?

Two dialogues this week brought this to my attention, and it is actually one of the main reasons I started this blog when I did.  The first conversation occurred on a Christian forum that I am a member of, in a thread discussing the death penalty from a Christian perspective.  Here is a paraphrase of one of the comments that appeared in the thread, “Well, I would hope that if I did anything that deserved the death penalty, that they would catch me, and carry out the sentence.”  I hate to break it to you, but we have all done things that deserve the death penalty according to the highest law in the land; God’s own law.  Has anyone really studied the stoneable offenses in the Old Testament (OT)?  There is a pretty big list including adultery, murder, not honoring your parents, etc… they earned the death penalty.  “Well,” you say, “I’ve never killed anyone, I’ve never cheated on my spouse!”  Any self-respecting Christian should have a ready comeback to that idea, straight from Christ’s own teachings, here’s a hint, see Matthew Chapter 5.  Not enough?  Many of my fellow Christians who like to push works, and even condemn others while trying to avoid condemnation themselves love the book of James, so let’s see what James tells us: James 2:10 For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all. Well, now, that changes a few things, or at least it should.

The second discussion that brought this to my attention was an interview done with John Barrowman (of Torchwood fame, go Captain Jack!) on a BBC show that I watched via youtube.  One of the topics discussed was the fact that John is openly homosexual.  Also, he made mention on this show (and elsewhere in other interviews as well), that he believes in God, and was brought up in the church.  Now, this post isn’t to discuss homosexuality, but rather something more fundamental.  John made the point that it was wrong for Christians, (or “other” Christians, perhaps) to say to him that he is evil, bad, and wrong.  Not only that, but he then made the comment that he was a good man.  Two things came to mind the first was that I’m sure there’ve been some “lovely” Christians that have indeed spat on Homosexuals, called them names, and pronounced damnation on them, calling them evil, bad and wrong just because of their homosexuality, and that’s a true shame.  The second thing that came to mind, is “what theology has John, and all those condemning homosexuals for their sin without looking in a mirror been taught?”

The stance clearly presented in scripture, and by Jesus Himself, is that none of us are “good.”  None of us.  Yes, without Christ, John Barrowman is evil, bad, and wrong, and so am I, and so are you.  That’s the whole point. There is none good but God, our righteousness is as filthy rags, no there are none that doeth good… “Yup, yup, yup, you’re right, none good, yup!”  No! Don’t just agree with it, think about it.  We are all a bunch of sinners, who, according to scripture, if we break one law, we get charged with ’em all!  All of our hope, all of our faith rests solely on Christ; not on what sin we haven’t committed, because we’ve committed them all according to the word.  There’s not one mere human better than any other.

Is this post a hidden message against the death penalty, or one saying homosexual acts are fine?  By no means.  Is it a message that supports sinning so that grace may abound? I join Paul in saying, “God forbid!”  There is indeed right and wrong, and sin that we should actively try to avoid with the help and teaching of the scripture, and The Spirit.  I’m just hoping this will help even one person soak this idea in and really think about it; it is fundamental theology, and is meant to get everyone’s eyes firmly on Christ, because He is indeed the source of our only true Righteousness.  It is also meant to banish the foolish idea that any one of us is “better” or less deserving of death than any other human; our only means of escaping the death penalty in this life or the next is faith in Jesus Christ!

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