Monthly Archives: March 2011

Meet the Austins…

Dear reader, check out this link to know what the point of this “review” is about; Madeleine L’Engle.  This is one of her books I just read for the first time…I’d met the Austin family previously in books that come later in the Austin family series.  I really enjoyed this story, and it did serve as a good introduction to the Austins, which in turn, sets up the rest of the books in the series.  It is a very quick read, and “easy” reading.

What suppers did the Austins enjoy? Standing rib roast with roast potatoes and carrots, spaghetti with carrots and garlic bread, Spanish rice, Shepherd’s pie, strawberry mousse, pork roast with applesauce and carrots, pot roast with deep-dish apple pie, bread pudding with raisins, tapioca, jell-o, raisin bread, steaks with baked potatoes and salad, baked beans with hot dogs chopped up in them, and the ever present beverages of coffee and hot cocoa.

What did they listen to while preparing all of this?  Brahms’ Second Piano Concerto, Rosenkavalier, Schonberg’s Verklarte Nacht, Handel’s the Cuckoo and the Nightingale, Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto, Handel’s Royal Fireworks, and John liked to listen to “The Gambler.”  The crew liked to sing; Cockles and Mussels, The Eddystone Light, You take the High Road, Oh, Susannah, Ash Grove, and Tallis’ Cannon.

What were the kids reading or the adults reading to them? The Jungle Book, Charlotte’s Web, The Secret Garden, The Sword in the Stone, and Doctor Dolittle.  Also, a book on Albert Einstein’s spiritual views was quoted and talked about, but no title was ever given.

Their furry companions that curled up at their feet?  Colette their french poodle, Mr. Rochester their Great Dane, and at least three cats; Prunewhip, Hamlet, and Creamy.

What was the fam up to in this story?  Skywatching as usual, including star gazing.

Good prayers and quotes included?

St. Francis’ Prayer:

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.
Where there is hatred, let me sow love.
Where there is injury, pardon.
Where there is doubt, faith.
Where there is despair, hope.
Where there is darkness, light.
Where there is sadness, joy.
O Divine Master,
grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled, as to console;
to be understood, as to understand;
to be loved, as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive.
It is in pardoning that we are pardoned,
and it is in dying that we are born to Eternal Life.
Amen.

A quote from Hildevert of Lavardin;

God is over all things, under all things; outside all;
within, but not enclosed; without but not excluded;
above, but not raised up; below, but not depressed;
wholly above, presiding; wholly without, embracing;
wholly within, filling.

A poem from Thomas Browne;

If thou could`st empty all thyself of self,
Like to a shell dishabited,
Then might He find thee on the ocean shelf,
And say, `This is not dead`,
And fill thee with Himself instead.

But thou art all replete with very thou
And hast such shrewd activity,
That when He comes, He says, `This is enow
Unto itself – `twere better let it be,
It is so small and full, there is no room for me.`

Fun book to read, the themes of childhood, change and death were interesting.  This book, more than L’Engle’s others that I’ve read, seemed geared toward “younger” readers, but adults who like her style and characters will enjoy this book as well.  On to read the second in this series…

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Filed under Humor, Musings, Of Interest, Prayer, Reviews, Sacred Secular, Uncategorized

Madeleine L’Engle…

I have a real love for a good book.  Nothing has to be spectacular, it doesn’t have to be Shakespeare, or even Twain…just good writing telling a good story.  I was first introduced to Madeleine L’Engle’s writings in school, where most kids are, A Wrinkle in Time was the first of her books I enjoyed.  At the time, I remember being slightly bewildered at L’Engle’s ability to tell a science fiction story while at the same time weaving it in with a character centered family style tale.  Since then, I’ve enjoyed many of her books, and am still happy to read some of them for the first time.

This being “The Christian Scribbler” I do indeed take an interest in the fact that L’Engle is often designated a Christian writer.  I always loved the spiritual aspects of her books, and the prayers, music, and religious discussion she always found a spot for.  That being said, I don’t always agree with her personal, or private, theology.  She tends toward universalism, which includes the idea that everyone will wind up being saved in the end.  For many Christians this would be a deal breaker, and you wouldn’t be allowed to enjoy her writings…for me, not so much.

I believe L’Engle’s style, and the content of her writings are fascinating, enlightening, and should spur anyone with an intellect to seek out information, music, and in fact, knowledge of all kinds.  I also like food.  And family.  And friends.  Reading her books reminds me of another of my favorite authors; Jan Karon and her Mitford series.  As I read L’Engle’s books I can’t help but be drawn into the families she writes about…caring what they are listening to, what they are fixing for supper (in a regular oven, or over a Bunsen burner), what books they are reading or subjects they are studying.  I was so interested in this kind of thing that I looked to see if they had ever put out a cookbook as a companion to L’Engle’s writings as they had with other popular books or series.  They hadn’t.

So, I decided to make my own lists of interesting bits from L’Engle’s works….I’ll be starting with Meet the Austins and going on from there.  Every time I make a new entry here on my blog, I’ll update this page with a new link to the new article.  I love the fact that L’Engle’s characters are smart, intelligent, thoughtful, talented, compassionate, etc…  The family scenes and discussions are fascinating, and remind me of some of the more thoughtful people in my life, including family and friends.

My “lists” for each book will include things like, “What’s for supper?”  Also, books a member of the family are reading, subjects they are studying, what music they are listening to, their Pets (which are key members of family life), and miscellaneous things, like prayers and quotes that feature in the storylines.   This is just meant to be fun way of sharing my enjoyment of these books with other fans, and perhaps get others to join in the fun by reading her works; the books that are hyperlinked will take you to my reviews and lists…

Austin Family books in order:

  • The Twenty-four Days Before Christmas (short story)
  • A Full-House: An Austin Family Christmas (short story)
  • Meet The Austins (Full-length book; first in the series)
  • The Anti-Muffins (short story, but included as a chapter in the newest editions of Meet the Austins)
  • The Moon by Night (Full-length book; second in the series)
  • The Young Unicorns (Full-length book; third in the series)
  • A Ring of Endless Light (Full-length book; fourth in the series)
  • Troubling a Star (Full-length book; fifth in the series)
  • A Severed Wasp (Full-length book; it overlaps with a different series, not “technically” an Austin family book)

Books about the Murray Family; AKA The Time Quartet, or Time Quintet

  • A Wrinkle in Time
  • A Wind in the Door
  • Many Waters
  • A Swiftly Tilting Planet
  • An Acceptable Time (Overlaps with the O’Keefe Family series)

Books about the O’Keefe Family

  • The Arm of the Starfish
  • Dragons in the Waters
  • A House Like a Lotus
  • An Acceptable Time (Overlaps with the Murray Family series)

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Filed under Musings, Of Interest, Reviews, Sacred Secular, Uncategorized