Interesting post at UD…

Uncommon Descent is a blog about Intelligent Design Theory, and has multiple contributors/authors.  Every now and again someone will post a blog that I find interesting.

The latest one that caught my eye was “The Psychology of Blinding Obedience to a Paradigm” by Barry Arrington.  It caught my eye for two main reasons, first I find the subject matter interesting, and second because he uses a bit of scripture to add to his idea.

First, it is possible for anyone with a certain paradigm to become blinded, if they aren’t careful.  This is true even of certain Christians with certain beliefs, but it is also true, as Barry points out, of other paradigms as well.  One of the keys to not becoming blind in one’s obedience to a paradigm is research.  This is where the fundamentals of true science can play a part, as we are to dig into things with the intent to find real and “true” information.  If one is presented with new info, it too should be sifted through and researched.

Many have this odd idea about Christianity that it tries to get people not to test things, not to research.   This couldn’t be further from the truth.  We are told quite clearly in scripture: 1 Thessalonians 5:21 Prove all things; hold fast that which is good. “Good” here carries with it the idea of truth.  Other places in scripture back this up as well.

What I do find to be happening more and more in the scientific community, as Barry points out, is a blind obedience that is not only being carried out by those firmly entrenched in the field of “science,” but is also fully expected of those just learning…grade school students, high schoolers, college kids, etc…  Blind obedience results from not proving all things, from not digging into a subject and asking questions.  It results from latching onto a certain POV, for whatever reason.

Do I think that there are some Darwianian scientists who question their beliefs and truly dig into them, looking for new info, and good counter-arguments?  Sure.  But, the bothersome thing is that there are currently too many who do not…and even those who do are afraid to speak out about their questioning.  This results in their passing on blind obedience to “the next generation.”

Barry used the story of Lazarus to illustrate this idea.  There were those people in the crowd that witnessed a full-fledged miracle first-hand.  They literally saw a formerly dead human being emerge alive from a grave, at the behest of Christ, and went to witness this fact to the leaders.  This new information did not alter the leaders actions, rather they became even more frantic in their pursuit of Jesus, in order to silence Him once and for all…they were stuck in their own paradigm.

John 11:45 Then many of the Jews which came to Mary, and had seen the things which Jesus did, believed on him. 46 But some of them went their ways to the Pharisees, and told them what things Jesus had done. 47 Then gathered the chief priests and the Pharisees a council, and said, What do we? for this man doeth many miracles. 48 If we let him thus alone, all men will believe on him: and the Romans shall come and take away both our place and nation. 49 And one of them, named Caiaphas, being the high priest that same year, said unto them, Ye know nothing at all, 50 Nor consider that it is expedient for us, that one man should die for the people, and that the whole nation perish not. 51 And this spake he not of himself: but being high priest that year, he prophesied that Jesus should die for that nation; 52 And not for that nation only, but that also he should gather together in one the children of God that were scattered abroad. 53 Then from that day forth they took counsel together for to put him to death.

Anywho, I thought the interplay between Barry’s idea and scripture were quite interesting.  Check out the article if you have time, and care about such things.

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1 Comment

Filed under Musings, Of Interest, Origins

One response to “Interesting post at UD…

  1. That’s interesting. I wrote a post about a similar thing not too long ago. The basic premise is that there’s a fundamental irony in rigid scientism, which (unlike science) stops allowing the questioning of certain principles. This is certainly not the case with all (or probably even most) scientists – just those who cling so tightly to their hermeneutic.

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