Finding the sacred in the mundane…

Some people, even some denominations as a whole, are better at recognizing that everything we do can include faith and an understanding that God is with us at all times.  One of the keys of this is finding meaning in all the mundane things we must do in this life.

I’m always reminded of the Shakers, who were so mindful of the fact that God sees all and is everywhere, that they would even take the time and effort to finish the back sides of drawers in a set of chest-of-drawers.  The part of a drawer that most humans would never see is built and finished just as beautifully as the front.  It is really neat if you get a chance to see it, and is one reason why true Shaker furniture is sought after.

If one makes that into a legalistic issue, then it fails to be “sacred;” however, if one sees what they did as a metaphor, it is a wonderful thought.

Paul tells us, Colossians 3:23 And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord, and not unto men; 24 Knowing that of the Lord ye shall receive the reward of the inheritance: for ye serve the Lord Christ.

Notice what it says; whatsoever you do.  Whatsoever.  If you are taking out the garbage, if you are washing dishes, if you are cooking, or jogging, or walking the dog.  In our minds should always be a reminder; believers are servants of Christ, we answer to no other master.  As such, if we are mindful of that fact, as long as we are doing what He’d have of us; such as taking care of our families, than we are actually serving Him in the mundane.

I have a slight…wellllll…not so slight problem with certain preachers that go on  and on trying to get a mass of people hyped up over going to be missionaries, and acting as though that is the ultimate thing that you can be called to do, and if you aren’t over somewhere risking your life, then it is meaningless before God.  Not so.  Not everyone is called to such a life, not in the least.

We are each unique, and God does not call us all the same.  Yes, there are general guidelines and expectations, but as far as living out our lives, even in the mundane, we should have an “ear” to God to figure out what He wants us to do.  If God tells you to stay home and raise your kids, and you do so, that is answering His call in a sacred way just as much as someone who is called to missions and goes.

Faith isn’t about us outdoing one another, it is about hearkening to God in our own lives.  Part of that is recognizing that those mundane tasks we all “love” so much may just be seen as sacred, if we are indeed answering God’s call.  Laundry, dishes, dusting, scrubbing toilets, teaching, mining, fishing, waiting on tables…they become much more meaningful, and bearable, if we find the “sacred” aspect of them in serving God.  Remember; whatsoever you do, do it as unto the Lord; it is Him we serve.

Is it easy to keep this in mind? Not in the least.  We literally cannot remember it all the time, somethings get too frustrating or overwhelming, but we can ask the Holy Spirit to help us remember these things, especially when we are just reflecting on the day, or getting ready for it.  And, it is one of those things that we have to be constantly reminding ourselves, because the “mundane” is labeled so for a reason.  It is far easier to live out if we are doing something “spectacular” in the eyes of other humans…but we are not their servants, we are His…and when we are His, anything He urges us to do, and we do with the help of the Spirit, becomes spectacular.

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4 Comments

Filed under Sacred Secular, Theology

4 responses to “Finding the sacred in the mundane…

  1. DB Williams

    Although I am not Catholic, I, many years ago, came across a short text entitled, The Practice of the Presence of God, which is by a monk, Brother Lawrence. His example of seeking God in every aspect of his life is just what you are referring to here. I have given a site where anyone can print, for free, the text. It is an amazing little book!

    http://www.practicegodspresence.com/brotherlawrence/index.html

  2. Kliska

    Thanks for the link, will check it out. Another perspective on this is that of the Amish, who I definitely differ from theologically, but who do believe that one can find meaning even in “everyday” chores.

  3. P'Mee

    What can I say? Amen.

  4. Pingback: The Prodigal Son via Breaking Benjamin’s “Medicate”… « The Christian Scribbler

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