Romans 1:20 and an example…

I wrote a whole post dealing with the fact that we are without excuse when it comes to a belief in God.  Of course one of the key verses behind this idea is Romans 1:20.

For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse:

Romans 1:20

I was watching the old movie about the life of Helen Keller when she was first introduced to Annie Sullivan; The Miracle Worker.  If you haven’t seen it, you should.  It shows the struggle that both student, Helen, and teacher, Annie, go through in order to reach and teach Helen who was both blind and deaf…and pretty much wild.  While I was watching it, two thoughts popped into my head.

One came to me as Annie physically wrestles with Helen to teacher her how to sit at a table, with a plate in front of her, and eat off of it with a spoon, instead of like an animal.  It has to be akin to how the Holy Spirit and the “old man” or old nature struggles within us once we are saved.  The Holy Spirit changing us from within, helping us to “see” what needs to be changed, and teaching us how, but our flesh still wrestling back, even if the change will be for our good…

The second thought was more like a reminder of one of my favorite facts about Helen. Helen Keller, the woman who was deaf and blind, and could not speak or understand any sort of language, in the beginning even sign language explained:

“In one of her letters, Helen told Bishop Brooks that she had always known about God, even before she had any words. Even before she could call God anything, she knew God was there. She didn’t know what it was. God had no name for her — nothing had a name for her. She had no concept of a name. But in her darkness and isolation, she knew she was not alone. Someone was with her. She felt God’s love. And when she received the gift of language and heard about God, she said she already knew.” from Phillips Brooks and Helen Keller.

Think on that!  Does it need any more discussion?

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3 Comments

Filed under Apologetics, Atheism, Sacred Secular, Theology

3 responses to “Romans 1:20 and an example…

  1. DB Williams

    What a wonderful analogy: the spirit struggling with us to eat “solid” food (truth), and in our ignorance, fear and confusion then resisting this force that we can’t see or hear.

    I once desired to become an atheist, and one Summer, during those dark days, in 1978, I found myself in Montreux, Switzerland. As I stood, one beautiful morning, looking out over Lake Geneva and the magnificent French Alps, it suddenly came to me in an instant, “This could not have happened by chance, there must be something greater than myself that created this!” It would be another seven years before I would bend to His will, but when I did, then this memory came rushing back into my mind. I wept the first time I read Romans 1: 20, because I realized it was and still is the truth, and God was calling me to Him!

    Great post! I hope many read it!

  2. Kliska

    DB, what a great story and example! I talked to one atheist that has the same sense when listening to some beautifully composed music…I compared that feeling to the feeling that all of us have at some point of something…bigger. The goal is not to dismiss that feeling, but explore it!

    Thanks for sharing!

  3. DB Williams

    Not to take up space here, but your comment on the atheist and beautiful music reminded me that Igor Stravinsky was an Atheist, in his early years, when he wrote much of his music. Later on in life, Stravinsky became a believer, and, during an interview, a few years before his death, he was asked about The Rite of Spring, his most famous piece, and he stated to the reporter, “I was merely the vessel through which Le Sacre (The Rite) flowed.” It seems that he, as us, had come to understand Romans 1:20 and that everything is from God!

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