Category Archives: Christianity

True Feminism

Say you are a Feminist in Conservative circles and you are likely to get a lot of looks and raised eyebrows.  I still maintain that it is up to my generation of women (and the one following us) to reclaim Feminism.  There are also people who insist that the God of the Bible is some kind of sexist bigot, but that cannot be further from the truth.  God has always recognized the role and power of women, after all, He is the one that calls us a “helpmeet” and the He calls Himself a “Help”… guess what, in Hebrew they are from the same root word.  A weak thing with no worth cannot help anyone.

Proverbs 14:1 The wise woman builds her house, but the foolish tears it down with her own hands.  I really like this particular verse because it shows some very important concepts that are often quibbled over in Christendom.  For example, it shows that we have free will, even women.  If we did not truly have free will, could God tell us that a foolish woman tears down her very own house with her own hands?  Without free will that would make no sense for a bit of wisdom that we are supposed to learn from and implement; be wise, not foolish.

Another aspect to this verse to note is that we women do the building up.  I build my house.  I do so by what I choose to put my faith in, and Who I choose to put my faith in.  I do so by my work ethic.  I do so by the way I treat my guests, my self-respect, my morality, my choice of mates, my choice of friends, how I handle my money, etc… I do that, not my husband, nor my father, nor my pastor.  Do I spend all my time on Facebook?  Do I spend it with my nose in the latest tabloid or watching TV 24 hours a day?  Do I have friends that truly care about me and care about the Lord, or do they just care about gossip?  Am I taking care of my house, my spouse, my family or am I letting the world take care of them?  Do I keep track of the money, the expenses, the investments, or do I let my husband do all of that?

Have we taught our daughters, nieces, friends, etc… that their choice of spouse is extraordinarily important, and that there are certain factors other than how “cute” a guy is to consider when building your home? And to any males who have read this article this far; have YOU took a good hard look at what God desires for you to have in a wife?  Are you willing to let your wife truly be a help to you, while at the same time being a good, kind, respectful, loving, strong leader in your home?  We are to be like a team of oxen in marriage; equally yoked and watching out for one another, each pulling the load.

And, of course, the number one issue; have I built my house on Jesus Christ?  He is the sure foundation and the only thing that cannot be moved. Have I trusted Him, do I talk to the Lord, do I read and study His word?  I need to make sure I have built my house on Him and not trusted someone else to do that for me.  So your husband is the bible expert?  Fantastic… but his faith isn’t yours.  Do you know why you believe on Jesus?  Do you have a personal relationship with God and not just one that is attached to someone else’s faith?

Anywho, dear readers, just some passing thoughts and questions…

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Book Reviews; The Duggar Collection

I am going to review all 3 major titles in what I call “The Duggar Collection.”  They include; The Duggars: 20 and Counting!, A Love That Multiplies, and Growing Up Duggar. The first two in the list were both written by Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar, the last was written by Jill, Jinger, Jessa, and Jana Duggar.  If you’ve ever read my review of Do Hard Things, this review will be similar.

First, some background.  I do watch the television series about this family on TLC; 19 Kids and Counting so I was already familiar with the Duggars and there were no earth-shattering revelations for long-time watchers of the show contained in the books.  If you like the show, you’ll like the books, if you like to mock the show (or the family) you’ll mock the books.  While the Duggars’ particular brand of Christianity isn’t my brand, I still respect their morals, commitment to family, financial position, etc… so I did enjoy all three books.

Second, if you want to cut the list down, I can help do that for you.  If you want a book about the parenting principles and the life stories of Jim Bob and Michelle, read A Love that Multiplies.  It covers very similar ground as the first book, but it is more recent and contains the story of Josie.  If you want a book about relationships and courting from the perspective of 4 young ladies, along with stories of the Duggar clan, then read Growing Up Duggar.

The good; the Duggars are a breath of fresh air in this modern world when it comes to parenting.  They care about their kids (yes, all of them), and have committed their time and energy to making sure their family is taken care of and brought up within a caring and loving environment.  The books give the reader a window into their philosophies, which they obviously ground in scripture the way they interpret it. They include their perspectives on debt, modesty, parenting, homeschooling, morals, business, courting, etc…  If you are interested in these topics presented with Christianity mixed in to all of them, then you’d probably enjoy the books even if you disagree.

I think that large families, as long as they are self-supporting, are awesome.  I’m amazed that some people hate the Duggars simply because there are so many of them.  They don’t take government support, they all seem bright and healthy, intelligent, interesting, etc… Whether a couple has no children, or 19, it is their choice and they can be a strong and happy family.

The girls’ book particularly was interesting to me, because I’m always curious of what the “next generation” thinks about all this.  They tackle the area of relationships, and do so in a generally thorough (yet sometimes detail-lacking) manner.  Their discussion on courting, parental relationships, and sibling relationships was informative, and again, refreshing.

The not-so-good; although the Duggars deny that they are a part of “The Quiverfull Movement” in Christianity, it is hard not to see the connection.  Why such a large family?  Because they believe that it is God and God alone Who determines the number of kids that a couple are blessed with, and this means no contraception allowed.  So, what’s wrong with that?  This particular movement tends to draw Legalists in by the boatload, and to judge others who don’t follow the same philosophy.  Happily, I can say that I don’t pick up a lot of judgmentalism from the Duggars, who overtly say that they teach that their way is not the way for everyone when it comes to having kids.  They simply stand by their own convictions and cite scriptures that they feel back up their POV.

Another not-so-good aspect to the family is that they “follow” or “read” materials and philosophies of some individuals in Christendom that are questionable in their theology, and perhaps even in their private lives.  Bill Gothard is one such example.  Anytime there is a strong teaching of different gender roles, one must be extraordinarily careful and be on the look out for sexual misconduct.  I’m one that believes in different roles for the genders in certain areas, and I’m also one of the biggest skeptics when it comes to a philosophy that uses words like “sweet;” think sweet, be sweet, keep sweet, as applied to females. Ugh. FLDS anyone?  Sex abuse anyone?  Bill Gothard has had sexual misconduct allegations following him around for awhile now, and we have to be sure we look on someone as being innocent until proven guilty.  However when talking of certain philosophies there is a great chance in some of them for women and girls to be abused.

Thankfully, I see no sign of that from the Duggar clan.  I don’t believe in condemning someone because of the people they read, but I include this type of information in my review because I want to make it clear that it is is a red flag for my readers if they decide to delve into the Duggars’ books.  Know that many of the ways they interpret certain scriptures are not the way that I, or even a majority, of Christians interpret them, and many of their resources listed are impacted heavily by those like Gothard and those in the Quiverfull movement.

In short, I liked all 3 books, though there was repeating information in each.  I have learned a lot about large families and also how certain scripture are interpreted by those from this perspective.  I truly appreciate the information they presented on raising kids, morality, and their faith. While everything seems to be going well right now for this family and the kids, there is always a chance that things could change, such as if we see one or more of the kids joining more mainstream Christian churches and “rebelling,” then we could see a different side to all of this. In fact, statistically, we’d expect to see some Duggar descendent choose their own path, as God guides the individual.

The danger in some of the teachings they push are just that, which is the danger of demanding everyone be a foot, or all be an arm in the Body of Christ; “Cookie-cutter Chrisitians” in other words.  We also must be sure that we are not relying on good works or conformity to save us, but rather on Christ for it by grace we are saved through faith.  It is a good thing to rely on God to guide us and convict us, and at the same time to make sure we are truly understanding scripture as it is meant to be understood.  So, just make sure you are firmly grounded in scripture and in faith when reading books on other beliefs within Christianity (such as the Duggars have); test all things and hold to that which is good and true.

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Filed under Christianity, Ministries, Of Interest, Reviews, Theology

It Matters Who Your Friends Are…

There are so many things that are different in our modern world than in days gone by that it is hard to pick out a topic to cover. Recently, however, I have been thinking and studying the effects of good parental involvement and teaching in children’s lives. One of the things in by-gone times that parents monitored were who their children befriended.

Now it seems it isn’t “cool” for parents to monitor something so “personal” as their children’s friendships, let alone to actually teach children that it does indeed matter who they hang out with, and that they need to be aware of the effects of their peers. We all know the peer pressure commercials and they have become a joke. How often, though, do we think about wisdom, intelligence, social manners, morals, etc… when it comes to who the next generation surrounds themselves with?

God makes no bones about it; Proverbs 13:20 He who walks with wise men will be wise, but the companion of fools will suffer harm. The teaching here is twofold; walk with wise individuals and you will actually be wise. Walk with foolish individuals and you will be hurt. It is crucial to remember that the bulk of Proverbs is underscoring listening to our Parents’ wise counsel, so the safe assumption here is that this bit of knowledge should be on the list to teach the next generation. Try that in today’s world, and the world will say that you have your nose in the air. That’s the world… so that underscores that we should indeed be teaching our kids to be selective in their friendships and that means monitoring who your children “befriend.”

For us older types, this brilliant Proverb also means we need to take a good hard look at who we attach ourselves too. As one simple example, this isn’t limited to friends, is it? How about our spouses? If we pay attention to the Lord and His guidance, and our blessed enough to stay married, our spouses are going to be one of the major people we “walk with.” So you’d better pick a good one, and not on the basis of the short-lived romantic hogwash love that the world forces down your throat. Do you want wisdom? The first step is to ask God for it, and that will include studying scripture to see what He has to say about wisdom. It is apparent to me that one of the keys is deliberately picking who we walk with.

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Filed under Christianity, Musings, Philosophy, Psychology, The Bible, Uncategorized

“There is no straw.”

We see it.  I know we see it.  What’s more, we feel it.  Something is incredibly wrong in this country of ours.  The U.S. of A. has taken a turn.  This turn is a culmination of poor decisions on the part of… well, almost everyone.  Our borders are not secure.  Our currency is suffering.  We are a nation of debtors living in a debtor nation.  Our morality has become laughable.  Common sense is gone.  Our “representatives” in government; whether in the House, Senate, or White House no longer represent us.  People who work hard, and/or work smart, and accumulate wealth are scorned and ridiculed, while those on welfare are strangely pitied and praised at the same time, being held up as political pundits that we should listen to, or be amused by.

And yet we wait.  We wait for the “last straw” we wait for it to break the camel’s back.  “What is it going to be?” we wonder.  Is it going to be a stock market crash so severe we all wake up?  Is it going to be another terrorist attack on our soil?  Will it be a natural disaster of epic proportions? Viral outbreak?  A leader so awful we all rise up?

And then it hits me; there is no straw.  We want a straw… we want something sooo definitive that we finally break into action, rally, come together as Americans and put things right.  So, we wait, and wait, and wait.  This is not a straw situation, rather it is a frog in the pot situation.  Folks, the change has happened so slow we grow accustomed to it.  Yes, we notice it in passing, but we don’t act on it.

It’s time.  We each have an impact on our nation.  It starts with us.  With a firm idea of who we are.  We are made in the very image of God Himself.  We all live in relation with other people; friends, co-workers, parents, kids, spouses, students, teachers, etc… we make a change in our nation by making a change in our lives.  Parents raise up your kids.  YOU. Teach them right from wrong, proper patriotism, not blind group think but true patriotism that shows them what the founding fathers intended for this nation founded explicitly on Judeo-Christian values, teach them the bible, the declaration of independence, and the constitution.

Spouses, love one another, serve one another, become strong in the Lord so that you can stand against the tide of negative changes, and help your spouse stand.  Come to understand that you have to get involved in politics if you currently care about this country.  We cannot sit on the sidelines.  It is our right as citizens of the U.S. to let our minds be heard, to share opinion especially if it is rooted in our religion.  The founders did it, they protected the right of us to do so, with the expectation that we would pay attention and do our moral duty to the nation.  You want to make a an impact to your fellow humans, the time to take action is now.

There is no straw.  Toss the kool-aid out, quit wasting away in front of the TV, get off your butt, see to your own health, the health of your loved ones, of your town, of your state, and of your country.  Do what you can in your own life.  You have the power.  Bow your knee to God, pledge to serve those He wants you to serve, and quit waiting.

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Filed under Christianity, Health, Musings, Of Interest, Religion and Politics

When are they going to realize it’s all true?

A new find discussed in an article at Archaeology Archive offers evidence that supports the accuracy of the book of Jeremiah (surprise, surprise)  Read all about it here: Book of Jeremiah Confirmed?

Here’s a snippet:

“Austrian Assyriologist Michael Jursa recently discovered the financial record of a donation made a Babylonian chief official, Nebo-Sarsekim. The find may lend new credibility to the Book of Jeremiah, which cites Nebo-Sarsekim as a participant in the siege of Jerusalem in 587 B.C.

The tablet is dated to 595 B.C., which was during the reign of the Babylonian king, Nebuchadnezzar II. Coming to the throne in 604 B.C., he marched to Egypt shortly thereafter, and initiated an epoch of fighting between the two nations. During the ongoing struggle, Jerusalem was captured in 597, and again in 587-6 B.C. It was at this second siege that Nebo-Sarsekim made his appearance.

He ordered Nebo-Sarsekim to look after Jeremiah: “Take him, and look well to him, and do him no harm; but do unto him even as he shall say unto thee.” (Jeremiah 39.12)

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Filed under Apologetics, Christianity, Of Interest, The Bible

Parents; it is your job to teach your kids about God.

I heard something on the radio today that disturbed me greatly.  What was it?  A preacher trying to tell parents the way to tell their kids about God, Jesus, and salvation.  Ugh.  No.  He was tossing words out there like “justification.”  Yeah, say that word to your three year old, and see if they understand.  The preacher was making a point in saying that you just keep telling the child the same thing over and over, and eventually, mysteriously, they’ll get it.

Any developmentalist will tell you that you don’t talk to a three year old the way you talk to a nine year old, it’s useless.  The preacher seemed to think that a child has to jump through a series of hoops in order to be well and truly saved, and that the kid needs to know everything an adult would know, and that the child needs to make sure to be old enough, etc… Well, yeah, children need to have an understanding of who Jesus is, and what He did.  But, Jesus didn’t ask how old the children were who wanted to come to Him.

Anyone, regardless of age is allowed to go to Jesus, in fact, it is encouraged.  The child isn’t going to be able to set down and write out a dissertation on sin and redemption, but that’s fine.  A child’s faith is held up as what we adults are to aim for.  A parent needs to evaluate each child and not compare them to one another.  Some will “get it” sooner than others, and that’s fine.  It is indeed your responsibility to always check along the way, for example, when your child wants to take communion, you need to make sure they do understand what it means.

Further, parents, it is your job to teach you children, not a preacher.  You need to know your own faith, and why you have it, good enough to explain that to your children.  Know faith and grace, know scripture, know Jesus.  Remember your kids are watching you and you need to make sure you realize you are their number one model.  Also, realize your child does not know what you know, you are not your child.  You may know that baptism isn’t required for salvation, and why, but your kids don’t, unless you TEACH them.

Some parents think that they can just give their children books, or have them watch cartoons, or listen to a certain preacher and that will be fine.  No, it won’t.  You are to raise your children up with the instruction that they need from you personally.  Ask questions, and then really listen to their answers.  Listen to sermons together, watch those cartoons together. Read the Bible together, and don’t water it down.

As a final thought; as you walk this road with your child, I would bet they’ll teach you a lot about God too, so be willing to learn.

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Teaching the tithe; holding the church back?

I’m continually blown away with how many preachers get the tithe completely wrong, especially in regards to the New Testament church.  I’m frustrated because I believe if giving where taught correctly, we would have a totally different attitude toward money.  I believe that the teaching of the tithe actually stifles giving.  I can “hear” myriads of preachers groaning, and rushing to claim that teaching the tithe is the only way to insure a percentage of the congregation actually gives.  Meh, that’s no reason to downplay the truth.

The tithe as a tool is fine.  The tithe as an obligation or means to a blessing isn’t.  If you need to use the tithe as an “easy” way to portion out your money, or are called by God to tithe, that’s perfectly fine, I’m not directing this article at you.  There are so many preachers out there making a certain statement that makes me grind my teeth.  What is that statement?  “How much of your income is God’s?”  What do they say the answer is?  Ten percent.  Sometimes they think they go more detailed and say the first ten percent. Wrong answer.

All of it.  ALL of it is God’s, not yours.  Further, if you are a believer, your house is His, your car is His, every minute of your day is His, your business is His, etc…  If we don’t change the way we preach this, we are limiting our understanding of God, and His relationship with us.  You may be called at any moment to utilize anything you “own” for His good.  I’m not saying this figuratively.  It is all His.  What do you think presenting yourself a living sacrifice to Him is all about?

The OT tithes, that were in place for the Jewish people were for them specifically.  And, it was much much more than 10%.  As with the law in the OT, the tithe was to teach us, it was to foreshadow what was to come.  The tithe was so that God’s business could be carried out and that was centered on the temple and the priests.  Guess what, now you are the temple and you are the priests.

If your reaction to this is “Yes! Now I don’t have to give up anything!” then you’ve missed the entire point.  No longer are we legally required to give, now we are to pay attention to God’ guidance on a very personal level and give as we are called.  Free will, cheerful giving.  That is the model for the NT church.  The early church had to be reigned in from giving too much.  The were giving everything to the apostles and those in need and keeping nothing to live on.

I just heard one preacher say that if you tithe you’ll be amazed that you never lack for anything. Bull.  I know good believers who thought they had to tithe, doing so “religiously,” with good hearts and wind up broke and in debt.  Preachers need to preach financial accountability to their congregations.  If you need help, follow someone like Dave Ramsey’s plan in a secular way.  If you owe a debt to someone else, pay it.  If you owe bills, those ARE debt.  God wants you to be a good steward and pay your debt.  God also wants you to be a good steward and quit being a consumer driven by every want and fad.

You are to be responsible and take care of your family, and you are to be responsible so that when God calls on you to give to a cause, or a teacher, or preacher, or to help someone you will be able to do so.    Remember, you are handling His money, not yours.  Are you to give?  Yes.  There are a few examples of where money should go in the NT; to those that teach you in the faith (Galatians 6:6), to those in need (esp. to widows and orphans), and to those who ask.  How many of us really look at Matthew 5?

Matthew 5:38 Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth: 39 But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also. 40 And if any man will sue thee at the law, and take away thy coat, let him have thy cloke also. 41 And whosoever shall compel thee to go a mile, go with him twain. 42 Give to him that asketh thee, and from him that would borrow of thee turn not thou away.

Wow.  This only makes sense and only works if we realize all that we have is God’s.  We are to be responsible with what He gives us whether it’s money, time, a house, car, land, a phone, a camera, etc…  We need to be praying to see what God would like us to do with His things, and then yield to the urge of the Holy Spirit.  Further, it is no one’s business to know how much you make, or how much you give.  That is between you and God.  But, be warned, God knows your heart, and He obviously knows what He is communicating to you.  Pray, and pay attention and ask for His help in doing as He directs.

Give generously, give cheerfully, be responsible with your money and make it serve you, don’t serve it.  The tithe is not a requirement for the church, but excuse making doesn’t work either.  As you sow, so shall you reap, and God truly loves a “hilarious” giver, for it mirrors Him and uses what He has given you to further His will.  Could you imagine the things our church could do if everyone embraced this idea?

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Jesus was not a hippie.

I can’t believe I actually have to type that.  I also have to apparently type; Jesus was not a Democrat, Jesus was not a Liberal, Jesus was not a Republican, Jesus was not a Conservative, and on and on and on.  Jesus was God made flesh, the Messiah, the Lion and the Lamb, the only perfect human who was also 100% God.

I’ve heard that phrase, “Jesus was a hippie” from several sources, and it always makes me wonder if the person saying that knows what a hippie was.  It is easy to romanticize political or societal fads and movements, but to associate Jesus with a romanticized version of a historical movement is dangerous in the extreme.  Some people do it to try to sound funny, some do it rhetorically to try to make a point as to how they would like Jesus to be.

Hippies.  What did they stand for?  One of the obvious things was “free love.”  What does that mean?  The idea of free love included an attack against monogamous marriage.  There is also a more generalized idea that a sexual relationship contains no obligation.  Sleep with who you want, whenever and wherever you want.  Does that sound like Jesus to you?

Another aspect of the hippie culture was their advocacy and use of drugs.  One of the focuses was on mind altering substances, such as LSD.  God desires us to have temperance and a sound mind.  We are never to imbibe a substance that completely alters our brain chemistry.  Even something like marijuana, despite its growing positive reputation, can trigger a psychotic episode that can in turn trigger lifelong schizophrenia.  The effects of these drugs on fallen human bodies and natures is negative in the extreme; for the individual, their families, and society.  Do you think Jesus advocates that?

How about peace?  The peace the hippies chanted about is not the peace Jesus preached to us and offers us.  We could have all the peace on this earth we desire and still lack peace in eternity.  Make love, not war.  Sure, that works in this fallen world.  The hippies could flourish here in the US where other people were putting their lives on the line to insure freedom of expression and freedom of speech.  The peace Jesus offers is grace unearned so that we can have a relationship with the creator of all.

How about nature and flowers and rainbows? Jesus is the Word of God, it was by Him and through Him that all was made.  Hippies made the age old mistake of worshiping the creation instead of the creator.  Rainbows should remind us of fallen man, and God’s promises.  Nature and flowers? Part of creation, so are we.  We were fashioned from the ground by God Himself.

As I mentioned before, most who try to paint Jesus this way want Him to fit an agenda that they personally believe in.  It doesn’t work that way.  To portray Jesus in any way other than Biblically is presenting a false Christ.

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“10Things You Can’t Do” Response…

Recently an acquaintance of mine posted this link on Facebook (it’s not her article, just a share), clearly in support of what it says; 10 Things You Can’t Do While Following Jesus.  Please do read it. I do tend to like lists like this, as they make it easy to breakdown and talk about point by point.  First things first; why did I feel the need to review and respond to this particular blog post?  Because one of my main pet peeves is anyone who paints Jesus like a milksop weakling, and quite frankly I’m offended when someone calls God Himself a hippie (I think I have my next article right there).

Alright, lets move on to the 10 points;

10) Exclude people because they practice another religion.  That depends on the context that we are talking about.  We can surely mingle with people of other faiths, help people of other faiths, study other faiths, and respect people of other faiths, and have them as friends.  On the flip side, Jesus made it clear that faith in anything or anyone other than Himself will have a negative eternal effect.  Jesus is the only way to The Father, and no one can have a relationship with God except through Him.  So, He also called us to make sure that people of other faiths know the requirement of eternal life; faith in Jesus Christ.

9) Exclude people for what they look like, how they were born or things beyond their control.  I’m in complete agreement with the first part of this statement.  But, “how they were born” or “things beyond their control” is a bit vague.  What does that mean?  Lets assume that this is a statement on something like homosexual acts.  Well, I was born with a seemingly inborn tendency to lie.  I confess it, and I’m a wonderful liar… but that’s a no-no, in other words being a liar is not what God wants from me.  So, I turn to Him to help me not lie.  Guess what? It works 90% of the time, and I’m working on the 10%.  It has nothing to do with my salvation, but has a lot to do with my sanctification.   In short, it is true that Jesus didn’t run from sinners, but to them.  Also, look at the woman caught in adultery and who was brought to Jesus, that dialogue ended with “go and sin no more.”  No exclusion, I agree.  No calling good evil and evil good either.

As a side note, a lot of the “ism’s” of our culture are truly reprehensible, those are the things that every Christians should fight against, including sexism, ageism, and racism.  Also the churches out there harming others instead of helping them should be ashamed.  For example, if someone is a diagnosed Kleptomaniac, they are indeed a thief, but kicking them out of the church isn’t going to be doing them any good as they can’t currently control their actions.  Community, therapy, monitoring, etc… can help the person curb that behavior, even if they have to fight it the rest of their lives.

8) Withhold healthcare from people. I had to read that twice to make sure that is what the author actually wrote.  It was.  He argues that Jesus was a fan of healthcare for all because He healed people.  Um… there is a world of difference between healthcare and miraculous healing.  Jesus was clear that He was healing people to show that He was indeed the Messiah, and He healed supernaturally. He used healing to show that He had the power to forgive sins. Healthcare from the government was never meant to be a “right” or something that was granted to us without us doing our jobs.  I guess Obama really is the second coming with his “wonderful” program Obamacare.   It is the church’s job to help those who can’t help themselves, esp. widows and orphans.  Physical health in this life is not my right, and Jesus never promised me that, and it certainly isn’t the government’s job to “heal” me.

7) Exclude people.  Let me quote this on in full, “Last time. Promise. Jesus was constantly including people. It’s a little concept called love. He was pretty big on it.”  Ugh.  He includes all people as sinners, and that all are invited to learn of Him, and faithe on Him.  Yes, indeed all are welcome to the church, and the church’s job is to tell someone about Jesus and how to be saved.  You are saved by turning to God, and faithing on Jesus.  If you are faithing on man, Buddha, Krishna, the Islamic God Allah, the earth mother, etc… you are not going to be included in Heaven.  On earth we should and can mingle with everyone, as long as we are clear that there are indeed two categories of humans; the saved and the unsaved, our job is to make sure the unsaved know how to be included in the saved category, that’s love.  Jesus said He did not come to bring peace, but a sword.

6) Let people go hungry. Jesus let people go hungry, after He made the point with the loaves and the fishes.  He fed ‘em, then they started following simply to get another handout of food.  He then explained that He is real food, the bread from Heaven.  Crowds wanted their bellies filled again, and He said they were shortsighted, that faithing on Him was what would fill us, not physical food.  Don’t get me wrong, if someone is in need, it is our duty to help them as they can; IF they are in need.  If they are lazy and not working, I’m actually damaging them if I let them continue to take from others what they did not earn.

Side note; the author says that world hunger could be solved, “There is not a food shortage in the world — there is enough for everyone. There is not a problem with having a distribution system capable of handling it; I can eat lobster from Maine while looking over the Pacific ocean. The problem is that we aren’t very good at sharing.”  That is not a true statement.  We are actually very good at sharing it, but there are leaders intent on stealing it in foreign countries.  They are starving their own people on purpose.

5) Make money more important than God (and the children of God). I agree with this simple statement, but not his following points.  The love of money is indeed the root of all evil, but going to shop somewhere like WalMart isn’t a sin.  When we serve money instead of it serving us (and by extension, God) that is when things sour.  Further, it is not the Government’s job to do the job of the church.  I don’t mind paying taxes for things that are the proper realm of the government, things like the roads and the military.  I do mind paying taxes for things that are not biblical, and no business of the government.

4) Judge others. Yes and no.  The context is never to judge another when it comes to salvation, and we are not allowed to make up sins to pick on.  We are also no longer allowed, religiously, to judge another person as being righteous or unrighteous.  We are to judge whether someone could harm us, or cause a brother or sister to stumble.  If we do judge someone else as a stumblingblock, that isn’t a judgment on salvation.  If you have a sheep biting and harming the other sheep, and that little flock is under your care as an under-shepherd, you don’t allow that sheep to hurt the rest.  It’s still a sheep, but you provide some distance between him and the rest of the flock.

3)Be physically aggressive or violent. Again, yes and no.  The author rightly tries to catch himself; Jesus did indeed become aggressive in a righteous way.  That shows it is indeed possible.  Jesus didn’t just drive the money changers out, He made the whip He used.  Let me repeat; He made the whip.  Also, it is true that later, He told Peter to put up his sword, but why?  Because Jesus was allowing history to unfold as it had to.  It wasn’t time for the apostles to fight, it was time for Jesus to be arrested.

Physical aggression and violence, for a Christian, should be extraordinarily limited.  Self defense, or defense of the innocent.  That can take the form of a just war if need be.  Attacking Nazi soldiers to free the Jews, for example, was a righteous use of force.

2) Use the church to hurt people. The church is “merely” those people that are “out-called ones.”  We are a group of people faithing on Jesus.  Of course the church shouldn’t be hurting people, quite the opposite.  We are taught to love God, each other, and even our enemies.  But, this is where the author calls Jesus a hippie.  Sorry, no.  He is lamb and lion.  To ignore that aspect of Jesus that we clearly see in Revelation is to preach a false Christ.  The church is to spread the good news and to be a community of like-minded believers.

1)  Hate. Not so fast.  Hating another human is a no-no; however, hate in and of itself is not a sin.  God hates.  We are to hate what God hates.  Do you love sin?  Do you love the fallen world?  Not if you are in tune with God.

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“Sacrificial” giving of money; not biblical for the church…

Over and over I’ve heard preachers try to teach about “sacrificial” giving.  Unfortunately that is not a biblical principle, since the word sacrifice is very specific in scripture, and is abused in this context.  Now, before some readers get their knickers all in a twist, let me clarify; free will giving is biblical, and we’ll talk about that, but this idea of sacrificial giving is another offhanded term that does not appear in scripture.

“You’ve got to give until it hurts,” that is the refrain that you can hear from many pulpits both in person and on the radio.  No, you don’t.  The idea of a sacrifice is glossed over when the term is used in connection with monetary giving.  A sacrifice in the bible is very very specific; it is about killing and offering up an organism to God. Sacrifice was to do many things, one of which was to remind us that for sin comes death.

To underscore this, notice what Paul said, “present yourselves a living sacrifice to God.”  He had to include and underscore the word “living” there; no longer do we offer sacrifice to God in the old way of death, but rather we are living organisms and we offer ourselves.  This is only possible because Jesus became a sacrifice for us, and now, that older system is done away with.

Giving money is not technically sacrificial.  You aren’t ritually killing anything.  We muddy the waters of the gospel by referring to a free will gift offering as sacrificial giving.  We are indeed to give money as directed by the Holy Spirit, and we are to do so cheerfully.  The term “sacrificial giving” is apparently another dysphemism adopted by teachers and preachers to try to lay a charge upon believers that just is not there.

The once and for all sacrifice is done, I don’t have to sacrifice “things” or “animals” anymore, but rather I’m to realize that all I have and all I am is God’s to do with as He please.  Then, it is a matter of being smart with my money, compassionate with my money, and generous with my money (and time, possessions, land, etc…) because they are His, not mine.  He promises to guide us, and we are expected to yield because we trust Him.  That’s faith.

 

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