Monthly Archives: October 2008

Lolcat does Halloween;

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Doctor Who news…spoilerish…

Say it isn’t true!!!! Oh, the anguish; Tennant steps down as Doctor Who.   Well…at least he’ll be around through all the Doctor Who specials in 2009.  On a positive note, perhaps this means the human-Doctor and Rose will make a reappearance at some point in the series? Ten’s been my favorite Doctor so far, and whoever they do wind up choosing, they have some work to do to keep the show up to par.

How depressing…but it’ll make the Specials…special. ;)

posted by OddShoe over at youtube.

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Apologetics; The Teleological Argument for God

Within Philosophy in general, there usually is a discussion of whether or not “God” exists.  Now, it is important to keep in mind that the starting point in philosophy is a general idea of “God” not a specific religious POV on who/what God is.  So, there have been many philosophers that attempt to approach the question from a general standpoint, often formulating arguments for His existence.

One of the major arguments is the Teleological Argument for God.  Many people just refer to it as the Design Argument…however, it isn’t just limited to “design” as in the design of living organisms, but also of the apparent “purposefulness” of the universe; which includes the ordered nature of it, such as the laws of physics.

This would also include things like the apparent unity, and harmony of systems within the universe.  I’ve posted before on Ecological Biodiversity, and how the whole system works together to the point that naturalistic explanations fall flat.

Paley often comes up in the discussion of the Teleological Argument for God; him and his famous watch analogy.  If you happened upon a watch…even laying on the moon…would you believe it just happened to assemble itself, or would you assume it was designed by an intelligence?  Simplistic explanation, but you get the picture.

Of course now, the Intelligent Design movement has kind of resurrected this idea and really grounded it in more technical science.  The mass amount of information contained in DNA is one example of a subject now scrutinized by ID…not only the amount contained in DNA, but also how that information is read and interpreted and if there can actually be any logical naturalistic atheistic explanation behind all of this, which, thus far, there is not.

If we want to move more to the specific, we find that indeed God Himself puts forth a teleological argument in several places in the Bible, for example;

Psalm 19:1 The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork.

Romans 1:19 Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. 20 For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: 21 Because that, when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened. 22 Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools, 23 And changed the glory of the uncorruptible God into an image made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and fourfooted beasts, and creeping things.

So, the idea that design and purpose shows forth the fact of God can be seen both in a general way, and also in a Christian framework.  As always in apologetics, some people will really like to use and/or hear logical arguments such as the teleological argument that can be used either generally to point to a God, or more specifically to point to The God.  Some people do not care for philosophical types of apologetics, and prefer to use other arguments.  I’m not coming down on the issue either way, in this blog post, just teaching about it, but I do know that as Paul said, everyone is truly without excuse.

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Filed under Apologetics, Atheism, Origins, Philosophy, Theology

Why the Tree of Knowledge?

I’ve had several conversations with people lately surrounding the idea of the Tree of Knowledge.  Why was Adam given the choice, or opportunity to disobey God…or rather, to not have faith in God?

That answer is quite obvious; Adam had to be given some form, or kind, of choice in order to truly have free will.  It is plain that God does not want humans as robots, or else He could’ve very easily made Himself a bunch of automatons to populate the earth.  So, in order for there to be free will, there absolutely must be a choice available; The Tree of Knowledge was that choice.

Now, I in turn ask the question; Why was the Tree of Knowledge the choice?  Why didn’t God just say; “You see that tuft of purple grass…don’t step on it.”  Would that not have been a free will choice between obedience and faith or disobedience and a lack of faith?  So, why the Tree of Knowledge in particular?

We are not directly told…but just mull it over a bit.  Here’s my opinion; if we were going to fall, which God knew we were, we needed the choice to be the tree.  If we fell, in other words, something about the choice itself would aid us in the future to get back to God.  I believe the Tree served that function.

If the Tree itself provided us with an idea of Good vs. Evil, then that absolutely helps us find our way back to God.  For one simple example, The Moral Argument for God is basically derived from that very idea.  The fact that humans know there is right and wrong (even if we disagree on the details) gives evidence of God.  A true and meaningful sense of morality only makes logical sense if there is an absolute and objective source for that morality.

The Tree did not create that morality within us; God did…but perhaps the Tree let us tap into it.  If the choice had not been that tree, it may have been much much harder for us to return to God because we would not have recognized right from wrong internally.

We have to has that internal sense of right and wrong in order to recognize our sinful state, and that is the beginning of the realization of our need to “get right” with God (which can only be done ultimately through Christ, of course).

In short, I do believe that Adam was “funnelled” to the Tree if he was going to disobey in order to derive some benefit from it, even though that choice resulted in the fall.  On a side note, it is important to remember that everything revolves around faith.  It is faith, or a lack of it that results in sin.  So, beyond eating of the Tree, Adam and Eve lacked faith in God and what He had told them…that was the foundation of the sin right there, not just the “work” of eating the fruit, and only through faith do we get back to God.

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Marcus Grodi, The Journey Home; Ten verses master list…

I’ve completed my series on Marcus Grodi’s list of ten verses (presented on The Journey Home on EWTN) that he says made him reconsider the Roman church.  These are verse he states that he never really “read” before in protestant circles, even when he was a preacher; verses that he felt contributed to his eventually becoming RC after they were brought to his attention.  I’ve taken each verse and examined it within its proper context, and even language when necessary.  In short, I see no evidence that these verses support an RC position…quite the opposite in fact.  Each link will take you to my blog post that is dedicated to that verse(s).

1) Proverbs 3:5-6; Catholic verses? Part 1

2) 1 Timothy 3:14-15; Catholic verses? Part 2

3) 2 Timothy 3:14-17; Catholic verses? Part 3

4) 2 Thessalonians 2:15; Catholic verses? Part 4

5) Matthew 16:13-19; Catholic verses? Part 5a and Catholic verses? Part 5b

6) Revelation 14:13; Catholic verses? Part 6

7) Romans 10:14-15; Catholic verses? Part 7

8 ) John 15:4; Catholic verses? Part 8

9) Colossians 1:24; Catholic verses? Part 9

10) Luke 1:46-49; Catholic verses? Part 10

Please do remember that I firmly uphold the fact that someone can be in/from the RC, or any other Christian denomination and be saved, and I have many good friends who are indeed RC.  As long as a person’s faith rests solely in God (The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), I do consider that person to be a brother/sister in Christ.  That being said, when I find teaching that contradicts scripture, no matter what denomination is putting it forward, I think it deserves to be discussed in a respectful manner, with our eyes toward discovering the truth with the help of the Holy Spirit.  If people read my “ministry reviews” they should be able to tell that I point out the flaws that I feel even my favorite teachers, and ministries have in their teachings…I did not write these blog posts to “pick on” anyone; rather I wrote them to make people stop and think and research these things to come to the truth…even myself if the situation warrants it, I always learn a lot from digging into scripture no matter what the reason.

Along those same lines, no one should ever blindly trust me to get something right; everything I teach or say should indeed be held up to scripture, and mulled over with the help of the Spirit.

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Filed under Apologetics, Catholicism, Conversion, Theology

Mix lolcats with lolvamps:

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Vampires…

What it is that those fictional blood suckers have or do that draws everyone’s attention so?  I don’t exclude myself from those that are interested in a good vampire tale or two.

They drain regular folks of their blood to survive, they can’t walk in the daylight (in most stories), they can indeed be killed, but baring a steak through the heart, an inferno, or a lopping off of the head they live forever.  In our modern times, they also are always portrayed as suave, mysterious, sexy, protective, etc…

There is an odd fascination with the concept of immortality…but immortality with a price, if that immortality is gotten through nefarious means.  Their strength, youth, beauty, etc… all come with a hefty price tag.  Most of them walk around guilt ridden, and full of angsty brooding…that, and the insatiable hunger for human blood.

Buffy, Angel, Dracula 2000, Dracula: The Series, The Lost Boys, The Anne Rice novels, The Historian, Twilight, Stoker, True Blood, etc… Vampires are everywhere, and the different writers all like to add their own twists…but many times the themes are the same.

The concept of immortality is something quite interesting from my perspective.  I think that it is very significant that humans mull over the idea, and that it evokes such strong imagination.  I, of course, feel that it is a tacit acknowledgment by the human psyche that we are indeed immortal.  And, we “instinctively” know that immortality is a powerful, but sometimes dangerous concept.

In mainstream Christianity we have the belief that all humans are indeed immortal.  I loved CS Lewis’ thoughts on it, and he urged everyone to remember that when we deal with fellow humans, we are interacting with an immortal soul…it tends to change the way we look at, and interact with others (and think about ourselves).

Also, Vampires must shed blood, or choose to drink blood in order to live.  I always find it interesting that the Bible clearly teaches that the life of the soul resides in the blood, and that it is by the shed blood of Christ that we were purchased so that we could spend our immortality in God’s presence…but the vampire’s tale is a cautionary one; bad things can happen if you attempt to gain immortality in the wrong way.

In many of the older tales, and some of the new, vampires could not harm someone if they held a cross.  Religion has always played a role in vamp tales; even the ones that make the point that their vampires aren’t affected by religious objects or people.

Another set of themes within vamp tales that makes me think of religion are the themes of damnation and/or redemption.  A human curses God, so God curses them…or vamps as demons or soulless, that’s the damnation side of it.  A vampire who desires to abstain from harming humans and to make up for their past, or find a way to break the curse, that’s the redemptive side of it.  And these tales are very effective in communicating to us the very serious nature of both of those themes (Angel is one of my favorites, as far as redemption stories go).

I continue to maintain that the fascination with all of these themes points to the notion that humans tap into them because the underlying ideas are real in some form, if only metaphorical.  Immortality is literally real, that we gain life by the shedding of blood, though not in the drinking of it, is real…that life resides in the blood, that power is dangerous, that we have to be careful what we wish for, etc…  It’s one of the reasons I do indeed like a good vampire tale, and that I find the “sacred” in the “secular” even amidst a good vampire yarn.

Just some fangy-fun musings…I’ll have to use some specific examples in the future as they come up…or fang-out.

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Filed under Musings, Sacred Secular